PRESS RELEASES

Tarek and John end hunger strike

Oct 2/13, 8pm

We learned today that Tarek and John have ended their hunger strike. They have resumed eating solid food under medical supervision. They saw a doctor, as well as staff from the Canadian Embassy, today.

Tarek and John commenced their hunger strike on September 16, a month after their arrest, to call attention to their unjust and arbitrary detention leading up to their scheduled hearing on day 45 (September 30). A secondary demand was the improvement of the conditions of their imprisonment in the form of increased exercise time. This was won.

As we know, on day 45, the Egyptian authorities extended their detention another 45 days, defying all logic, evidence, and fairness, as well as the entreaties of the Canadian government and 147,000+ people. Facing another 45 days, and having won their secondary demand, Tarek and John ended their hunger strike.

While we are relieved, we do not believe that freeing them has become less urgent. We are not willing to wait for day 90 and are not interested in the ridiculous claims made by the Egyptian authorities about the reasons for their continuing detention.

We still need the Canadian government to close the loophole and ask for Tarek and John’s immediate and unconditional release, and we hope that Canada is considering multilateral diplomacy and reconsidering some of its trade relations with Egypt.

Tarek and John Update: Time to close the loophole

Oct 1/13, 10pm

The Toronto Star’s article, “John Greyson and Tarek Loubani: Egypt considering murder charges against Canadians” (published Oct. 1) contained the same list of accusations – which Tarek and John characterized in their own statement as a “grab-bag of ludicrous charges” that the district prosecutor released 42 days ago.

At that time (Aug 20/13), we wrote: “the prosecution’s press release is a clear attempt to put a group of foreigners arrested at different times and places into a single group to create a far-fetched story about foreigners to justify ongoing imprisonment. No allegations against John and Tarek have been relayed through consular officials or their Egyptian counsel. No Egyptian official has linked any names, much less Tarek and John’s, to these far-fetched allegations.”

42 days later, nothing has changed, other than the imposition of 42 days of pointless suffering on Tarek and John. There is still no specificity to these accusations. There is still no linking of any specific accusation to any specific person. A spokesperson for Egypt’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs provided another set of equally ridiculous accusations to Reuters and the Toronto Star over the weekend.

We appreciate Prime Minister Harper’s statement on September 29, that in the absence of charges, Tarek and John should be released immediately. But the statement, like previous statements by Minister Baird, leave a loophole for the Egyptian authorities. Given the abuse Tarek and John went through upon arrest, the wild nature of the accusations, the lack of a fair process under the emergency law, and the lack of credibility of the judicial system after 46 days of arbitrary detention, it should be completely clear that any charges that are brought at this point will be as absurd and abusive as the process has been to date. We need Prime Minister Harper and Minister Baird to close the loophole and ask for the immediate and unconditional release of Tarek and John.

If the Egyptian government refuses to heed the call from the PMO, there are diplomatic options. Canada’s Export Development Corporation (EDC), a government body, provides funding to Canadian businesses that operate in Egypt. Canada also has multilateral options to work with the United States and Europe, who have larger-scale ties to Egypt.

Egyptian authorities extend detention of two Canadians for a further 45 days

September 30th, 2013

For immediate release –

45 days after their initial arrest while seeking Egyptian police help returning to their hotel at a checkpoint, Canadians Dr. Tarek Loubani and John Greyson have had their detention extended for a further 45 days by Egyptian prosecutors.

An Egyptian Foreign Ministry spokesman, speaking to Reuters, confirmed the men would be charged with “participating in an illegal demonstration”. The spokesman, in the same interview, indicated that prosecutors were considering espionage charges against the two Canadians based on “surveillance equipment” they found in their possession.

The renewal of detention comes days after a statement by John and Tarek was released where they recounted their experiences in Cairo.

The day of their arrest, the pair were filming a demonstration near their hotel when Tarek responded to calls for a doctor. The pair reported they witnessed and documented the deaths of fifty Egyptians, who were “students, workers, professionals, professors, all shapes, all ages, unarmed,” according to their statement.

After leaving the site of the demonstration and approaching police for help finding their way to their hotel, the pair reported being “arrested, searched, caged, questioned, interrogated, videotaped with a ‘Syrian terrorist’, slapped, beaten, ridiculed, hot-boxed, refused phone calls, stripped, shaved bald, [and] accused of being foreign mercenaries.”

“Given John and Tarek’s horrendous experiences from the day of their arrest until now, we have absolutely no faith that they will receive justice at the hands of the Egyptian legal system,” commented Cecilia Greyson, John’s sister. “We have every reason to believe, given the absence of evidence against Tarek and John, and the ridiculous nature of the charges, that they are not being held for anything that they did; they are being held because of what they saw and documented on August 16th,” she added.

“By unashamedly accusing Tarek of providing medical care to severely wounded Egyptians, and John of filming the unfolding carnage, the Egyptian Government have only acted to tarnish their own image and credibility,” said Mohammed Loubani. “Tarek is a doctor, and John is a filmmaker. This is not a complex case. It is a simple case. Providing medical aid to the wounded and filming historic events as they unfold is what doctors and filmmakers do,” he added.
“The Foreign Ministry’s assertion that Tarek and John’s equipment – a laptop, camera gear, a home wireless router, and a toy helicopter – could lead to further espionage charges only serves to highlight the heightened state of paranoia and xenophobia sweeping Egypt, whose government also arrested a stork,” said Mohammed Loubani.

“We stand together with the Canadian Government, the many artists, filmmakers, and 145,000 petitioners of all walks of life who are calling for the Egyptian Government to put a stop to this tragic episode and release John and Tarek immediately,” concluded Cecilia Greyson.

Impending Charges? Tarek and John in their own words

September 28/13, 11am

We have held on to this statement out of fear that the Egyptian authorities would harm Tarek and John if we released it. But given the announcement of impending charges in the Toronto Star today, we think that their own words can explain what the “evidence” the Egyptian authorities claim to have is. We believe that the impending charges have much more to do with what Tarek and John witnessed on August 16th, rather than what the Egyptian authorities claim they did.

Statement:

“We are on the 12th day of our hunger strike at Tora, Cairo’s main prison, located on the banks of the Nile. We’ve been held here since August 16 in ridiculous conditions: no phone calls, little to no exercise, sharing a 3m x 10m cell with 36 other political prisoners, sleeping like sardines on concrete with the cockroaches; sharing a single tap of earthy Nile water.

“We never planned to stay in Egypt longer than overnight. We arrived in Cairo on the 15th with transit visas and all the necessary paperwork to proceed to our destination: Gaza. Tarek volunteers at Al-Shifa Hospital in Gaza, and brings people with him each time. John intended to shoot a short film about Tarek’s work.

“Because of the coup, the official Rafah border was opening and closing randomly, and we were stuck in Cairo for the day. We were carrying portable camera gear (one light, one microphone, John’s HD Canon, two Go-Pros) and gear for the hospital (routers for a much-needed wifi network and two disassembled toy-sized helicopters for testing the transportation of medical samples).

“Because of the protests in Ramses Square and around the country on the 16th, our car couldn’t proceed to Gaza. We decided to check out the Square, five blocks from our hotel, carrying our passports and John’s HD camera. The protest was just starting – peaceful chanting, the faint odour of tear gas, a helicopter lazily circling overhead – when suddenly calls of “doctor”. A young man carried by others from God-knows-where, bleeding from a bullet wound. Tarek snapped into doctor mode…and started to work doing emergency response, trying to save lives, while John did video documentation, shooting a record of the carnage that was unfolding. The wounded and dying never stopped coming. Between us, we saw over fifty Egyptians die: students, workers, professionals, professors, all shapes, all ages, unarmed. We later learned the body count for the day was 102.

“We left in the evening when it was safe, trying to get back to our hotel on the Nile. We stopped for ice cream. We couldn’t find a way through the police cordon though, and finally asked for help at a check point.

“That’s when we were: arrested, searched, caged, questioned, interrogated, videotaped with a ‘Syrian terrorist’, slapped, beaten, ridiculed, hot-boxed, refused phone calls, stripped, shaved bald, accused of being foreign mercenaries. Was it our Canadian passports, or the footage of Tarek performing CPR, or our ice cream wrappers that set them off? They screamed ‘Canadian’ as they kicked and hit us. John had a precisely etched bootprint bruise on his back for a week.

“We were two of 602 arrested that night, all 602 potentially facing the same grab-bag of ludicrous charges: arson, conspiracy, terrorism, possession of weapons, firearms, explosives, attacking a police station. The arrest stories of our Egyptian cellmates are remarkably similar to ours: Egyptians who were picked up on dark streets after the protest, by thugs or cops, blocks or miles from the police station that is the alleged site of our alleged crimes.

“We’ve been here in Tora prison for six weeks, and are now in a new cell (3.5m x 5.5m) that we share with ‘only’ six others. We’re still sleeping on concrete with the cockroaches, and still share a single tap of Nile water, but now we get (almost) daily exercise and showers. Still no phone calls. The prosecutor won’t say if there’s some outstanding issue that’s holding things up. The routers, the film equipment, or the footage of Tarek treating bullet wounds through that long bloody afternoon? Indeed, we would welcome our day in a real court with the real evidence, because then this footage would provide us with our alibi and serve as a witness to the massacre.

“We deserve due process, not cockroaches on concrete. We demand to be released.

“Peace, John & Tarek”

Deputy PM of Egypt in Toronto this week?

Sept 22/13, 9:30am

A good friend of Tarek and John’s found this article in Bonjour Egypte:

http://bonjouregypte.com/ArticleDetails.aspx?ArticleID=53890

The article, published yesterday, says that Egypt’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for International Cooperation, Zeyad Bahaa Eddine, is coming to Canada – specifically, to Toronto. He is coming to have “high level discussions” about “ways to support Canada-Egypt economic cooperation”.

We believe that Canada-Egypt economic cooperation would be best facilitated if people traveling to Egypt could know they were safe from arbitrary detention of 37 days and counting. We are hoping that those “high level discussions” include questions like: Why haven’t Tarek and John been released? When will people traveling to Cairo have guarantees that they will not be arbitrarily detained? Do Egypt and Canada intend to do business-as-usual while Egypt continues to arbitrarily detain Tarek and John?

We will be trying to find the Deputy PM to ask him these questions, and we hope the press can do the same. We expect that the Egyptian Ambassador to Canada will know where the Deputy PM is.

Tarek and John are on hunger strike

Canadians detained in Egypt refuse food to protest the arbitrary nature of their detention

September 16, 2013
12:00pm

For immediate release –

Canadian filmmaker, John Greyson, and emergency room physician, Tarek Loubani, have informed friends and supporters through their Egyptian lawyers that they will be refusing food beginning September the 16th to protest the arbitrary nature of their detention by Egyptian authorities.

Greyson and Loubani, who were transiting through Cairo on their way to Gaza where Loubani was carrying on a medical aid project, and Greyson was preparing for a film project, have been detained in Cairo’s Tora prison for the past 31 days. During that time, Egyptian officials have not provided any reason for the ongoing detention.

Greyson and Loubani’s detention could be extended up to 2 years without formal charges being laid according to new emergency measures put in place in Egypt.

“We can only imagine the anguish that John and Tarek feel after realizing that their detention could be extended for so long in what can only be described as an arbitrary process that lacks any credibility,” said Cecilia Greyson. “We know that they did not take the decision to begin a hunger strike lightly, and we want them to know we will do everything we can to support them and get them home soon,” she added.

“We have been overwhelmed by all of the support we have received in our campaign to bring Tarek and John back home,” said Mohammed Loubani. “We are also grateful to the many Department of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade (DFATD) employees, and consular officials who have worked so tirelessly to make sure Tarek and John stay safe and are returned to us as soon as possible,” he added.

“We also want to thank Prime Minister Harper, Minister Baird, and Minister Yelich for advocating for John and Tarek’s release at the highest levels of the Egyptian Government,” said Mohammd Loubani. “We are especially looking forward to the results of discussions with the Egyptian Prime Minister, Mr. Hazem El-Beblawi; Deputy Prime Minister, Gen. Abdul-Fatah Al-Sisi; and Minister of Interior, Mr. Mohamed Ibrahim about John and Tarek’s ongoing detention,” he added.

A change.org petition calling for the release of the two Canadians has received 115,000 signatures to date. In addition, 311 prominent cultural and academic figures have signed a letter calling for John and Tarek’s release. Among the signatories are Alec Baldwin, Alex Gibney, Arundhati Roy, Atom Egoyan, Ben Affleck, Charlize Theron, Danny Glover, Sarah Polley, Naomi Klein and Michael Ondaatje

Amnesty International has issued an urgent action (http://www.amnestyusa.org/sites/default/files/uaa24813.pdf) about Tarek and John, asking for letters and phone calls directly to Interim President Adly Mahmoud Mansour, Minister of Defence General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, and Public Prosecutor Hesham Mohamed Zaki Barakat.

Supporters of Tarek and John will be gathering at the Egyptian Consulate in Montreal at 1pm on Tuesday September 24. “The Egyptian authorities seem to be sending the message that Egypt is not a safe place to travel to, that if you go there, you can be jailed for a long time and with no recourse,” said Justin Podur. “We want to send the message that we will not forget our friends, and we will not settle for anything less than their immediate release.”

Update on John and Tarek: Detention extended again

Sept 15/13, 3pm

After a brief meeting in Tora prison, where Canadians John Greyson and Tarek Loubani have been held for the past 30 days, the Cairo district prosecutor, Mohamed Heta, announced today that he would extend their detention period for a further 15 days.

Egyptian authorities have not provided any reason for the extension or for the ongoing detention of Greyson and Loubani. Greyson and Loubani were first arrested in the early evening of Friday, August 16th, when they approached Egyptian police officials to ask for directions in the Azbakiya district of Cairo.

“We are obviously extremely saddened to hear about the extension,” said Cecilia Greyson, “but just as importantly we are now certain that John and Tarek’s detention is completely arbitrary, and the process they face lacks any semblance of fairness or credibility.”

“While we have approached the Egyptian authorities in good faith and provided them with sworn affidavits, travel itineraries, and other particulars clarifying the nature of John and Tarek’s trip to Gaza, the Egyptian Prosecutor has alternatively missed and delayed important hearings into John and Tarek’s case and then extended their detention repeatedly without cause,” added Cecilia.

“Tarek and John have answered every question that has been put to them and now it is time for the Egyptian authorities to do the same,” said Mohammed Loubani, Tarek’s brother. “Why is Egypt detaining a prominent Canadian filmmaker, and a physician on his way to provide medical aid in Gaza? Why has the Prosecutor consistently missed, and delayed the hearings that he himself had set to review their case? Why are they not allowed even two hours outside per day? Why were Tarek and John held for 30 days in a crowded cell with 38 other inmates, a single sink, and one toilet?” he added.

“We want the Egyptian authorities to respect the evidence, to respect the appeals that have come from Canada, from the Canadian government and from over 100,000 people, all of which show unequivocally that Tarek and John should be freed now,” said Justin Podur, a friend of both Tarek and John’s.

Update on John and Tarek: No decision, no release

September 5, 11pm

Tarek and John had another visit from consulars and from our lawyers yesterday. We have heard more about how they are doing, which continues to be summarized as “good health and high spirits”, although they have now been in for about three weeks, entirely at the prosecutor’s discretion, and our own frustration and that of friends and supporters continues to grow.

Thanks to the many artists in the film community who love and respect John’s work, a #FreeTarekandJohn button is a new hot item at the Toronto International Film Festival.

We will be having a press conference (by invitation only, to members of approved media outlets) – which we will cover on the website.

Tarek and John are scheduled to appear before the prosecutor again on September 11, which will be day 26 of their detention. At that point, the prosecutor will again be able to decide to continue their detention and meet with them 15 days later (September 26), or release them that day, or afterward, or indeed, before.

We continue to call for their immediate release, and ask supporters to continue calling the Egyptian Embassy in Ottawa, the Egyptian Consulate in Montreal, and for our friends in other countries (the US, UK, and elsewhere) to call the Egyptian embassies and consulates in their own countries to press for the immediate release of John and Tarek.

Update on John and Tarek: Met with prosecutor, but no decision for a few days

August 31, 8:30am

This morning, the district prosecutor in Cairo met with our lawyers, staff from the Canadian Embassy, and John and Tarek. This was the meeting that had been set for Thursday.

The prosecutor said his own investigation was continuing and he was waiting for additional information, which he expects to come in another few days, before making his decision about whether Tarek and John would be released. Our lawyers will be checking in daily to see if the prosecutor has made his decision.

Tarek and John remain in high spirits.

Tarek and John’s scheduled hearing with Cairo Prosecutor did not take place today

August 29, 2013 - 14:00

For Immediate Release –

A hearing with the Prosecutor for the Azbekiya district of Cairo was not held as planned today, and has been delayed pending further notice. No reason for the delay has been provided.

“We are confident that the evidence we have gathered for the hearing will prove conclusively that Tarek and John were indeed innocent bystanders and should be released immediately” said Justin Podur, a friend of the two detained Canadians. “While we are frustrated that Tarek and John continue to be detained, we are hopeful that a hearing will be rescheduled for the near future,” he added.

“We have no doubt that a fair hearing of the facts will ultimately prove that no reasonable basis exists to detain Tarek and John,” said Podur.

Responding to the delay, Minister Lynne Yelich said, “We continue to work at the highest levels to confirm the specific charges against Dr. Loubani and Mr. Greyson. As we have not yet received confirmation of the charges, the Government of Canada calls for their release.”

The Greyson and Loubani families extend their thanks to John and Tarek’s many supporters, Ministers Yelich and Baird, and to the Department of Foreign Affirs and Trade Development (DFATD) and consular staff who have worked so tirelessly to ensure John and Tarek are swiftly released.

“We have been touched by the outpouring of support our families have received in this difficult time,” said Cecilia Greyson, John’s sister.

“We especially wanted to thank the DFATD staff who have been working around the clock to keep us updated, and the consular officials who have kept in regular contact with John and Tarek,” she added.

 

Update: Prosecutor did not appear, no hearing today

Aug 29, 2013, 11am

After waiting the entire day outside the prison, and with curfew approaching, our lawyers had to leave as the prosecutor had not arrived by the end of the day. Tarek and John remain in prison. No word has come about rescheduling their appearance before the prosecutor. No other hearings took place, including for other prisoners who were up for their appearances before the prosecutor.

We do not yet know if the detention order is being extended and have not heard news concerning the next scheduled appearance. Despite our frustration, we are asking supporters of Tarek and John to wait for further news.

Update: We have retained Egyptian counsel, and have some legal clarifications

12:30pm, August 21/13

We have hired Shalakany Law Office to represent Tarek and John. One of our lawyers, Adam Khaled El Shalakany, has agreed to speak to media on legal aspects of the case.

Our lawyers have confirmed for us that the Film Makers Syndicate has filed a complaint to the Public Prosecutor about the case of John and Tarek and are awaiting a reply.

As supporters know, the Canadian Embassy has re-opened in Cairo. Consular staff have told us that they expect the second consular visit to take place tomorrow, and that meeting will include our lawyer as well as consular officials.

A few legal clarifications are in order. First, there have been no charges laid. The 15-day detention order announced by the prosecutor (not a judge) yesterday to the Egyptian press is an order that allows the prosecution to hold people pending investigation.

The prosecutor announced a series of allegations that will be investigated, but in such a press announcement, the prosecutor is not bound by any rules of evidence and as a result the press release was full of wide-ranging, far-fetched, and outright bizarre accusations.

We would like to repeat that these are not formal charges, and this 15-day detention order is also not a jail sentence – it is just a detention order pending investigation. There is absolutely nothing precluding Tarek and John’s release on any day of this 15-day period. In fact, the prosecutor can roll this 15-day period into another 15-day period, and so on. This means that there is no legal or other logic to waiting for the elapse of 15 days.

35,000 people have signed a petition at change.org, thousands have made phone calls. This outpouring of support for Tarek and John is heartening and inspiring.

We have the same demands: the immediate release of John and Tarek. And we still want supporters to write to the Egyptian embassy and consulate, as well as Canadian officials.

 

Update: Replying to far-fetched allegations, calling for immediate release

1:30pm, Aug 20/13

Today a district prosecutor in Cairo sent a press release to domestic Egyptian media outlets referring to the detention for 15 days of nine foreigners — 4 Irish, 2 Syrian, 1 Turkish, and 2 Canadian — pending investigation into a wide-ranging list of allegations concerning events that took place at the al-Fateh mosque and the Azbakiya police station.

These two sets of events were distinct in space and time. Four Irish siblings were arrested on Saturday August 17, when police raided the al-Fateh mosque. Tarek and John were already in custody at the time.

foreign journalist was reportedly detained on August 14, and is still in custody. Tarek and John arrived in Cairo on August 15.

There have been numerous other reports of arrests of foreigners in other locations and times.

We are not sure of the identities of any of the nine foreigners mentioned, but the prosecution’s press release is a clear attempt to put a group of foreigners arrested at different times and places into a single group to create a far-fetched story about foreigners to justify ongoing imprisonment.

No allegations against John and Tarek have been relayed through consular officials or their Egyptian counsel. No Egyptian official has linked any names, much less Tarek and John’s, to these far-fetched allegations.

We continue to demand nothing short of their immediate release.

(Justin Podur)

Update Monday August 19: No visit today, pressure needed for immediate release

4:30pm, Aug 19/13

Although we believed there was going to be a consular visit to Tarek and John in their Cairo prison today, there was no visit.

CTV reported today, based on an anonymous Canadian government source, that Tarek and John were arrested on August 16 after walking into a police station to ask for directions. This makes sense, given the phone call we received from Tarek, in that there was very limited background noise and Tarek seemed quite surprised. They were arrested along with others at that time, and have been held since. The same source said that Tarek and John were “roughed up”, but at the consular visit yesterday (August 18) Tarek and John both conveyed the message that they were okay.

There is, to date, no further consular visit scheduled. We have been told that Canadian embassy staff have requested a visit, but there is no information about when that visit might take place.

The Canadian government’s public statements have been based on seeking clarification of the charges against Tarek and John. We believe, however, that given the impossibility of any plausible charges, all those interceding on their behalf should be calling for their immediate release.

We are asking friends and supporters to contact the Egyptian authorities to ask them for the immediate release of John and Tarek. We also ask that Canadians contact the Canadian authorities and ask for vigorous intercession on behalf of John and Tarek.

We have established a new website for these updates: www.tarekandjohn.com

Updates will be posted there as well as here.

Detained Canadians’ Families Request Pressure Be Applied on Egyptian Government to Secure Their Immediate Release

August 18th, 2013
15:30pm EST

For Immediate Release -

Egyptian authorities continue to detain two Canadians, Professor and Filmmaker, John Greyson, and Emergency Physician, Tarek Loubani, four days after their initial arrest.

The families of the two detained Canadians are calling on the Canadian government to work towards their immediate release.

“Tarek and John were in Cairo on their way to Gaza” commented Dr. Justin Podur, a friend of the two detained Canadians. “Tarek was continuing a medical collaboration that has been established between the University of Western Ontario and the Emergency Department of Al Shifa Hospital, Gaza’s largest hospital, while John was conducting preparatory work for a film project in Gaza,” Podur added.

The ongoing detention of the two Canadians is especially concerning in light of the Egyptian military’s ongoing violent crackdown against protesters and journalists.

“We are very concerned about John’s safety” said John’s family members, Cecilia Greyson and Stephen Andrews. “We are confident that the Canadian Embassy in Cairo is doing everything they can to secure their immediate release” they added.

“We are calling on Minister John Baird and the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade & Development, to call for the immediate release of John and Tarek,” said Mohammed Loubani, Tarek’s brother.

Egyptian Authorities Continue to Detain Canadian Filmmaker and Emergency Physician

August 18th, 2013
15:30pm EST

For Immediate Release -

Egyptian authorities are currently detaining two Canadians, Professor and Filmmaker, John Greyson, and Emergency Physician, Tarek Loubani, 48 hours after their initial arrest.

Egyptian authorities have yet to provide a reason for the ongoing detention of the two Canadians.

“Tarek and John were in Cairo on their way to Gaza” commented Dr. Justin Podur, a friend of the two detained Canadians. “Tarek was continuing a medical collaboration that has been established between the University of Western Ontario and the Emergency Department of Al Shifa Hospital, Gaza’s largest hospital, while John was conducting preparatory work for a film project in Gaza,” Podur added.

The ongoing detention of the two Canadians is especially concerning in light of the Egyptian military’s ongoing violent crackdown against protesters and journalists.

“We are very concerned about John’s safety” said John’s family members, Cecilia Greyson and Stephen Andrews. “We are confident that the Canadian Embassy in Cairo is doing everything they can to secure their immediate release” they added.

“We recognize that Egypt is going through a painful transition,” said Mohammed Loubani, Tarek’s brother “but arresting a physician and filmmaker and detaining them without due process is clearly a step in the wrong direction.” He added, “the Egyptian transitional Government has frequently repeated its commitment to democratic values and the rule of law. The continued detention of John and Tarek clearly falls short of that commitment.”